Album Review – Hyperomm / In My Own Spaceship (2021)

Dealing with the conquest of space in different parts of history, the new and exciting album by this one-man army from Russia touches on historical facts and thoughts on the topic of our future.

3.5rating

hyperomm-in-my-own-spaceship-2021Dealing with the conquest of space in different parts of history, In My Own Spaceship, the third full-length opus by Moscow, Russia-based Melodic Death Metal project Hyperomm, following up on the success of the band’s 2019 album Transcendence, touches on historical facts and thoughts on the topic of our future, all taken from the innovative mind of the band’s founder, vocalist and multi-instrumentalist Anton Trubin. Recorded, mixed and mastered by Anton himself, who was also responsible for all vocals, guitars, keys, sampling, lyrics, songwriting and the album’s artwork and design, In My Own Spaceship invites the listener for a metallic space journey together with Anton and session drummer Vladimir Fomenko (of bands like Lautreamont and Дебри), all embraced by a more futuristic version of the music played by renowned acts the likes of In Flames, At The Gates and Arch Enemy.

Rocket Scientist (1929) kicks off in full force to the sick blast beats by Vladimir and the always melodious but piercing riffs by Anton, resulting in a true headbanger that lives up to the legacy of Scandinavian Melodic Death Metal to set the tone in such futuristic album, followed by Hope Springs Eternal (2150),  where poetry flows from its lyrics (“Our fathers killed this place / Blood of their grandsons on their hands / We are looking for a clue / That will come to the rescue”) while the music blasted by Anton is imposing and epic from start to finish. Then guest vocalist Katerina Zabolotskaya brings a beautiful touch of finesse to Close Your Eyes (2151), where Anton once again slashes his guitar in great fashion accompanied by the thunderous beats by Vladimir in an amazing display of modern-day Metalcore and Melodic Death Metal, and there’s no time to breathe as our journey through space and time goes on in E Pur Si Muove! (1633), showcasing crisp, intricate riffs and drums while Anton growls and roars like a creature from outer space.

Investing in a more aggressive and demonic sonority, Anton and his Hyperomm put the pedal to the metal in Humanity’s Dream (1961), a great option for slamming into the pit in the name of metal and science, whereas a video game-inspired start explodes into first-class Melodic Death and Industrial Metal titled Emotional Anchors (2055), where once again Anton roars rabidly form start to finish while he delivers ass-kicking riffs and solos for our total delight. In Who Are on the Stars? (3000BC), get ready for another round of cryptic words declaimed by Anton (“Our grandfather’s fathers talked about the skies / That gods and our ancestors indwell there / They look onto us and guide our lives / Oh how we want to look at them”) amidst an intricate, Dream Theater-ish sound, while slowing things down a bit Anton fires Invention/Dissemination (2200), showcasing a heavier and darker atmosphere spiced up by Anton’s futuristic keys; however, it’s not as vibrant as the rest of the album. And lastly, we’re treated to the melancholic, pensive outro 13799000000 Years Ago, featuring arrangements by guest Alexander Glinsky and, therefore, putting a beautiful and climatic finale to In My Own Spaceship.

hyperomm-2021Anton’s journey through space and time can be appreciated in its entirety on YouTube and on Spotify, but of course if you want to show your support to our dauntless Russian metaller you should purchase the album from his own BandCamp page, from the Soundage Productions’ webstore, from Apple Music, from Amazon or from Discogs. In addition, don’t forget to follow the project on Facebook, Instagram and VKontakte for all things Hyperomm, an to subscribe to his YouTube channel for more of his unique music. Having said all that, what are you waiting for to jump on Hyperomm’s spaceship and follow Anton on his wild quest through space? And instead of the silence found out there, you better be prepared for an overdose of first-class metal music by such creative and hardworking musician hailing from Russia.

Best moments of the album: Close Your Eyes (2151), Humanity’s Dream (1961) and Emotional Anchors (2055).

Worst moments of the album: Invention/Dissemination (2200).

Released in 2021 Soundage Productions

Track listing 
1. Rocket Scientist (1929) 5:03
2. Hope Springs Eternal (2150) 4:21
3. Close Your Eyes (2151) 4:53
4. E Pur Si Muove! (1633) 5:55
5. Humanity’s Dream (1961) 5:44
6. Emotional Anchors (2055) 5:13
7. Who Are on the Stars? (3000BC) 4:17
8. Invention/Dissemination (2200) 4:53
9. 13799000000 Years Ago 1:52

CD bonus track
10. We Made Because We Could 5:01

Band members
Anton Trubin – vocals, guitars, sampling, drums

Guest musicians
Vladimir Fomenko – drums (session)
Katerina Zabolotskaya – female vocals on “Close Your Eyes (2151)”
Alexander Glinsky – arrangements on “13799000000 Years Ago”

Album Review – Hyperomm / Transcendence (2019)

Dealing with otherworldly, cultural ideas, thoughts and systematic overviews of postmortem life, the sophomore album by this one-man Russian army will teach you a lesson in Melodic Death Metal.

Founded in 2016 in Moscow, Russia by multi-instrumentalist, sound producer and designer Anton Trubin, Melodic Death Metal one-man project Hyperomm has just unleashed upon humanity his sophomore full-length album entitled Transcendence, a follow-up to his 2017 full-length opus From Nothing to Eternity and his 2016 debut EP …Death, once again highly influenced by iconic names of the scene such as Children Of Bodom, Kalmah, Omnium Gatherum and In Flames, but bringing to our avid ears Anton’s own fresh and more technical twist. Featuring a dark cover art created by Anton himself, and with lyrics written by Demether Grail (from bands like Arcanorum Astrum, Grailight, Skylord and Zmey Gorynich), Transcendence is about otherworldly, cultural ideas, thoughts and systematic overviews of postmortem life, thematically devoted to various forms of life after death and dealing with the eternal existence of the soul.

“Transcendence was recorded in my home studio. The process itself was different from traditional bands because I use MIDI drums. The sound of drums is the foundation of a good metal mix, so sampling drums is one of the most important parts of my work on the overall sound. I start by recording one track and mixing it at once. First I get a sound that suits me, after that, when I compose and record songs, I hear almost the final result at the same time. It helps me with the arrangements,” commented Trubin on his creative process, also adding a few comments about the overall sound of the album.  “I tried to achieve a more aggressive sound than on the first album. The sound of drums is leaning more towards a modern metal sound, but there is still a lot of classic melodic death metal in the guitars and melodies. Many use the drop tuning, but I’m playing in standard tuning. I’m trying to do the hard sound without using any low tuned guitars, but by composing good riffs.”

Portal is in fact an intro that’s not just an intro, but a short and sweet display of modern and melodic metal music by Anton presenting his piercing shredding and roars, setting the stage for Weighing of the Heart, where Anton definitely feels like a full-bodied band right from the start, with his scorching riffs and damned beats living up to the legacy of bands like In Flames and Soilwork, not to mention the whimsical keys in the background bringing more balance to the music. And an epic and symphonic intro explodes into sheer speed, rage and progressiveness in Metempsychosis, an amazing display of Anton’s dexterity as a multi-instrumentalist showcasing poetic lyrics darkly vociferated by our one-man army (“On dying the soul flies off / Into the original world / Into the aerial trough / And then reborn on the mold”).

Sounding closer to what In Flames are doing nowadays, but of course with Anton’s own personal touch, Patala is another feast of classic riffs and pounding beats perfect for breaking your neck headbanging, followed by the excellent Eternal Feast, where it’s interesting to witness how the keys make the whole song sound and feel very futuristic and experimental, while the other instruments bring forward traditional metal elements, resulting in what’s perhaps Anton’s closest creation to classic Progressive Metal. In Charnel Wraith, a shredding extravaganza supported by old school drums and ethereal keys, we face more of Anton’s wicked lyrics (“Without goodness your black life was dwelled / You die in torment, eaten by demons / And thrown into the grave without farewell / Tormented self-gnawing genie”), whereas Illusory State is very vibrant and groovy from start to finish thanks to the amazing job done by Anton on bass and drums, exhaling melody and intricacy and exploding into a sonic havoc at times, all spiced up by a beautiful keys solo by guest Sergey Shulzhenko (from Sunless Rise).

In Vortex of Hell, Anton shreds his stringed axe in great fashion while at the same time hammering his drums mercilessly in a fusion of old school and modern-day Melodic Death Metal that will certainly please all fans of the genre; then after the wicked instrumental bridge Transcendence, Anton returns for one final blast of his hybrid of modernity and rage in The Story, once again presenting a solid balance between heavy riffs and stylish keys, with the music flowing as smoothly and detailed as possible until the very end. In addition, some versions of the album will contain two sick bonus tracks, the first being Living in a Cage, offering the listener over five minutes of Hyperomm’s trademark sound, while in 3000 we’re treated to a pop song by Ukrainian singer and DJ Ivan Dorn, from the 2014 album Randorn (check out the original one HERE), turned into ass-kicking metal music.

It’s truly impressive how only one musician was capable of crafting a multi-layered and thrilling album like Transcendence, which is available for a full listen on YouTube and on Spotify, and on sale from the project’s own BandCamp page or from several other locations by clicking HERE, all by himself, and such humongous amount of hard work, focus, talent and tenacity must be praised by all of us metalheads by following Anton and his Hyperomm on Facebook and on VKontakte. Having already released two outstanding albums and one EP, there’s nothing but a brilliant path ahead of Anton armed with his multiple instruments, positioning him not only as an example of what DIY is really all about, but also as a role model for any musician from the underground metal scene, with Transcendence being the perfect depiction of how powerful the music by lone rangers like Anton can sound.

Best moments of the album: Metempsychosis, Eternal Feast and Vortex of Hell.

Worst moments of the album: The Story.

Released in 2019 Independent

Track listing
1. Portal 1:53
2. Weighing of the Heart 4:30
3. Metempsychosis 3:20
4. Patala 3:53
5. Eternal Feast 4:04
6. Charnel Wraith 3:49
7. Illusory State 5:01
8. Vortex of Hell 5:19
9. Transcendence 1:30
10. The Story 4:15

Bonus tracks
11. Living in a Cage 5:11
12. 3000 (Ivan Dorn cover) 2:56

Band members
Anton Trubin – vocals, guitars, sampling, drums

Guest musician
Sergey Shulzhenko – keys solo on “Illusory State”