Album Review – Cabal / Magno Interitus (2022)

***Review by Luke Hayhurst, writer for Morbid Wings (Print) ZineVM Underground Fanzine and Doom-Metal.com***

This is my first experience of Danish band Cabal and I can only describe the sound they create as weaponized music. This their third album to date, entitled Magno Interitus and released through Nuclear Blast Records, is a sort of conglomeration of Blackened Deathcore, Djent, Dubstep, Doom and Hardcore.

What the band strive to achieve is a sort of gloomy, doom laden atmosphere, and this they achieve. Underneath that atmosphere however is something far more sinister. Whilst this kind of music isn’t my thing, I can certainly appreciate what has been pieced together here. So instead of banging on about what bands this reminds me of, (None, I have very little knowledge of this style) I’ll instead try to describe how this album makes me feel and what it brings to mind.

If I were a film maker engaged in creating a movie about two warring factions, one a desperate bedraggled remnant of humanity and the other a sleek, mechanical army of robots, (Yes, I am aware I’m essentially talking about the later Terminator films) then this would be my soundtrack. For this album sounds like mechanized Armageddon, and its unstoppable unwavering post-industrial style that fuses the disjointed nature of Djent with a more scattergun Dubstep element, as well as hostile crushing Deathcore, would be the perfect fit for my soundtrack.

In my opinion, a band like Cabal defies genre boundaries. If a band can take someone like me who has no real appreciation for Deathcore and make me think about what I’m experiencing, then they have to be a very talented and creative band indeed. So whilst a true Deathcore fan would give this a higher grade, a novice to the style like me to give it a seven I think says even more about why you should listen to Magno Interitus.

Best moments of the album: The album ends very strongly with Exsanguination and Plague Bringer.

Worst moments of the album: Nothing to massively complain about.

Released in 2022 by Nuclear Blast Records

Track listing
1. If I Hang, Let Me Swing 3:14
2. Insidious 2:09
3. Magno Interitus 3:27
4. Existence Ensnared 3:25
5. Insatiable 3:26
6. Blod af Mit 4:17
7. Exit Wound 2:43
8. Violent Ends 2:41
9. Like Vultures 3:05
10. Exsanguination 3:20
11. Plague Bringer 3:45

Band members
Andreas Bjulver Paarup – vocals
Christian Hammer Mattesen – guitars
Chris Kreutzfeldt – guitars
Malthe Strøyer Sørensen – bass
Nikolaj Kaae Kirk – drums

Guest musicians
Simon Olsen – vocals on “Insidious”
Joe Bad – vocals on “Magno Interitus”
John Cxnnor – industrial noises on “Blod af Mit”

Links
Cabal Official Website | Facebook | Instagram | Linktree | Spotify | BandCamp | YouTube

Album Review – Diabology / Father of Serpents (2022)

***Review by Luke Hayhurst, writer for Morbid Wings (Print) Zine, VM Underground Fanzine and Doom-Metal.com***

The sophomoric album from young Los Angeles based trio Diabology, Father of Serpents is the band’s first opus with new bassist Destin Treu who replaces previous bass player Joseph Mazisyuk. Another significant change is that whilst debut album Nobody Believes Me was self-released, Father of Serpents has label backing through Dissonant Hymns Records.

Their debut album was nothing short of an out right banger. Playing an insanely catchy brand of Blackened Thrash Metal, Diabology came out of the blocks with all guns blazing and laid a foundation with which to build something really special. Two years on and their second opus sees the band effect a stylistic shift. Gone is the Blackened influence and in comes a more modern sounding Thrash Metal with a huge amount of Groove Metal influence.

Diabology also pulls off something for the second time that a lot of bands never manage, and that is creating an album that gets stronger and stronger the further in you get. For the first few tracks they hammer out some impressive but steady tracks that are in the process of feeling out the bands new more mainstream direction. However, by the time they kick into the superbly melodic Eat My Heart Out they are well and truly at home. During March to the Sea there is something about the vocal structure that kept bringing System of A Down to mind, whilst the chugging ferocity of Ode to Ogtha has an almost Sludge like quality to the riffs as well as a little Death Metal influence around the guitar leads. New bassist Destin Treu also becomes far more prominent as the album progresses and has some impressive bass leads during this track and the equally powerful Chimera.

Their debut album is a nasty blackened slice of filthy thrash with a lot of stank on it. Father of Serpents is a far more progressive and mature offering that grows in power and intrigues the further into the journey you venture. Plus you have to love an album that features a song about fucking cockroaches!

Best moments of the album: From the start of March to the Sea until the album’s climax is spectacular.

Worst moments of the album: Nada!

Released in 2022 by Dissonant Hymns Records

Track listing
1. Father of Serpents 4:15
2. Writhe 3:21
3. The Softest Grave 4:15
4. Eat My Heart Out 5:03
5. Spoil 2:03
6. Blackblood 3:35
7. March to Sea 4:58
8. Ode to Ogtha 5:20
9. Chimera 5:37
10. Lighthouse Hymn 5:41

Band members
Jesse Bergen – vocals, guitars, bass
Jack Kleinman – guitars, bass on “Spoil” and “Chimera”
Matt Morales – drums

Links
Diabology Official Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | Linktree | Spotify | BandCamp | YouTube

Interview – Konstantin Shepes (Lifetaker)

Lifetaker

***Interview by Luke Hayhurst, writer for Morbid Wings (Print) ZineVM Underground Fanzine and Doom-Metal.com***

Luke Hayhurst: Greetings Konstantin and to all of Lifetaker. How is life right now in Germany?

Konstantin Shepes (Lifetaker): Hey Luke, thanks for having us! Since we can not speak for every soul living in this country. Indeed; to us life seems quite bearable at the moment because we are stoked about our new record that came out on Friday!

LH: I won’t lie, until you messaged me about your new album I had not heard of Lifetaker. With that in mind, can you tell me about the genesis of the band? How you came into existence, and how you came to choose the provocative name, Lifetaker?

KS: Lifetaker was formed back in 2018, and we’ve known each other for years. However, we played in different bands up until this point. So, forming Lifetaker became a lucky twist of fate in a way. The band turned out to subjectively fulfill every aspect of being in a band that each member was missing at some point in the past. So, the genesis of Lifetaker lies in the fact that four dudes who share the same vision on art and musical direction happened by mere accident.

You are right! The name itself may appear kind of provocative but so does the music!

LH: You are about to unleash an absolute colossal panzer attack of a second album entitled ‘Der Letzte Raum’ which translates into English as The Last Room. What can you tell me about the concept behind the album name?

KS: We went with “Der letzte Raum” because we thought it’s a decent allegory for the word “crypt” and at the same time the title is not over-explaining things to the listener. On the other hand, it made sense to choose a German title since the songs are performed in German. This is an idea we finally decided to do on this record because it allows us to put lyrics to songs that the songs deserve. Overall, the record is not meant to follow a specific concept. Every song stands on its own.

LH: I’m intrigued by the artwork for the new album. Who designed the piece and what instructions did you give them? How happy are you with the final piece?

KS: The artwork for “Der letzte Raum” is an actual painting by the Russian artist Veronika Polonskaya. We loved it at first sight and worked things out so no instructions were needed.

LH: I mentioned in my review that I’m not massively well versed in the style you play. You combine the very best elements of Grind, Sludge and Hardcore. Which bands would you say are direct influences to the Lifetaker sound?

KS: To be honest, and by saying this I am really honest… We are not influenced by any band out there. We love music to the fullest, of course we do, and we listen to a lot of stuff out there for sure. But, over the years we figured out that being influenced by other artists leads to nothing but the past. We record all the time and besides the records we have already put out, there is an uncountable amount of b-sides on our hard drives that never made it on a record. What drives us is vaguely motivated by music. It is more likely that we let things happen naturally based on our experiences as artists, as musicians, as human beings…true to the motto: If it feels right, it is right. By saying this, I mean that there is not a lot of overthinking going on and we do not plan everything down to the last detail. When you think of a Lifetaker record, and everything that lies beyond, you can think of a car crash. Things happen when you do not expect them to happen!

LH: I saw on your social media that you describe yourself as an anti-fascist band. Do you consider yourself a politically influenced band and how does that channel into your work?

KS: To our understanding anti-facism, or identifying as an anti-facist band, means that you are embracing the future with a healthy mindset and respect for your environment. And the people you are surrounded by, no matter who they are and where they come from. Lifetaker is not meant to be a political band because we prefer the subject of art over the subject of politics. In my opinion, there is no such thing as political art. It is always art, or politics, never both. The moment you try to inject your political taste into art, you are a politician and not an artist. This is what propaganda means. As a band, we really don’t feel like betraying the potential of art because of propaganda that is based on nothing but personal taste. Overall, political views are never channeled into our work.

Album Review – Lifetaker / Der letzte Raum (2022)

LH: Have you had any dealing with bands of a fascist nature? How prevalent in Germany would you say National Socialist ideals are within the music scene?

KS: No, we never had to deal with artists or bands of fascist nature and never will. We do not deal with facism, we smash it!

Concerning National Socalist ideologies within the German music scene. I would say there are people who do not make a secret out of it and are proud to carry these ideals. And there are people who flirt with these ideals but would never admit it in public.

In both cases, the only thing we as a band can say is fuck them!

LH: Getting back to your music. You released your debut album ‘Night Intruder’ back in 2020. How do you feel your sound has progressed since your first album going into your second?

KS: The sound has progressed in a way that we have managed to let go and get rid of certain aspects that are not necessary. The overall statement of a song/record is based on how we have pictured it before recording. Compared to our debut, the new record is straight to the core madness! Both in sound and songwriting, you will find a more punk and noise inspired approach to it.

LH: You have released the new opus on a great looking LP through Black Omega Recordings, who also released your first album. How did this collaboration come about? Why did you decide to stay with the same label?

KS: John who runs Black Omega Recordings used to be the vocalist for a band that I am friends with. At the time, Lifetaker was looking for a label when it came to the release of Night Intruder. We asked John if he would be interested in releasing the record. Since John is a really cool guy, who shares the same views and beliefs, plus the fact that he obviously must have enjoyed the record, it came to the collaboration that lasts until today.

The fact that we stay with the same label is based on the principle that we only work with people who share the same vision and who are truly dedicated towards what they do. We like authenticity, that is why we go with Black Omega Recordings and Lower Class Kids Records.

Lifetaker

LH: Do you take much notice of your local music scene? Are there any bands local to you that you feel people should be paying more attention to?

KS: Sure, we always keep an eye open for what is going on right now! We would love to shout out our friends in Isocult. Check them out, they definitely deserve more attention. It is your way to go if you are into cold post/wavy electronic tunes!

LH: What are the upcoming plans for Lifetaker once the album is unleashed? Will you be touring the new album? How hard is touring right now in Germany, what with the current energy crisis?

KS: We have already started working on new material for future releases. Hopefully we’ll be able to properly tour the new album since COVID-19 made it nearly impossible to play live for the past two years. Furthermore, we hope that the energy crisis will not get us in too much trouble. We are constantly working on things so that we can do what we love most, play live! Let’s see what the future holds for us.

LH: That is all I have for you. Thanks again for taking the time to answer my questions. I shall leave the final words for you.

KS: All the best to you and everyone out there! Stay safe!

Links
Lifetaker Facebook | Instagram | Linktree | Spotify | BandCamp | YouTube

Album Review – Lifetaker / Der letzte Raum (2022)

***Review by Luke Hayhurst, writer for Morbid Wings (Print) Zine, VM Underground Fanzine and Doom-Metal.com***

Prolific Grind/Hardcore/Sludge quartet Lifetaker have returned with a sophomoric full length album entitled Der Letzte Raum (“The Last Room”) which will see the light of day later this month on an impressive looking LP, put out via Black Omega Recordings.

If you are going to call yourself Lifetaker you damn sure best have a sound to match the statement, and these German chaos merchants go about proving their mettle over the course of fifteen short sharp bursts of violence incarnate. I’m not massively well versed in either Grindcore or Hardcore so I’ll instead spend my time telling you how the album sounds rather than trying to unpick the bands myriad influences.

And what it sounds like is what I imagine having your face forcibly dragged along a cobbled street at a hundred miles per hour might sound like. A violent uncontrollable maelstrom of bludgeoning beats, Buzzsaw riff-age and a vocal style from the gutters, spewing forth bile and spite at every available moment. And yet at times Lifetaker produces moments of pure unadulterated fist pumping madness such as the delightfully catchy Kehlbiss or the equally as fun sounding Kadaverstille which are surely destined to be pit favourites at any upcoming shows that the band grace.

An absolutely banger of an album from start to finish; chaotic and carnage filled, viciously spiteful and intoxicatingly gratifying. Like a Panzer tank belligerently bulldozing your house and making you ask for more! Plug this directly into my veins and leave me to it!

Released in 2022 Black Omega Recordings

Track listing
1. Bunkerjugend 1:33
2. Patrizidprotokoll 2:31
3. Fleischwolf 1:37
4. Strafisolator 1:11
5. Alpha Antichrist 1:02
6. Kehlbiss 1:05
7. Störfunk 0:49
8. Kadaverstille 1:25
9. Blutopfer 2:05
10. Gottgeburt 1:22
11. Madenvolk 0:55
12. Schlafparalyse 1:42
13. Tempelfaust 1:49
14. Vernichtungstanz 2:22
15. Gamma Mörser 2:15

Band members
Konstantin – vocals
Alex – guitars
Gerrit – bass
Nico – drums

Links
Lifetaker Facebook | Instagram | Linktree | Spotify | BandCamp | YouTube